Ukraine needs women to win the war – and the peace

 

Ukraine needs women to win the war – and the
peace


“Ukrainian can do everything.” These
words from Maryna Popatenko, Deputy Minister of Youth and Sports of Ukraine,
reflect the key role women  had to play
when their country was under Russian attack.

 In a
conversation with Ukrainian women in government and civil society, her position
is clear. If the country is to emerge from the war as a strong democracy and
join the European Union as it wants, it must recognize this evolving role of
women and use it to improve levels of gender equality.

 seven
female diplomats” was sent to capitals around the world to discuss
sanctions against Russia. At a time when men between the ages of 18 and 60 were
barred from leaving the country, these women answered President Volodymyr
Zelenskyy’s call for military equipment and humanitarian aid.  Now women fight on the battlefield too. .
This compares to NATO countries like France, where women make up just 15% of
the military, Germany and Spain 12%, and 
the US 17%.

Female skills

They bring particular chops with them. Yevgenia
Zakrevska, a  counsel and now  elderly drone driver, describes how she has
established better vertical lines of communication across  gangs and between commanders and dogfaces of
different units, all of which helps ‘ the 
politic decision-  timber of our
commanders ’.   Women also play a  crucial 
part in  guarding families fleeing
the fighting. With the real  threat of
sexual exploitation or  mortal
trafficking, women are trusted more readily when it comes to registering those
internally displaced by the war, a number 
presently put at  further than4.5
million. They organize transport to take the displaced to safety in neighbouring
countries, and  womanish psychologists
are  furnishing  internal health comforting after the First
Lady, Olena Zelenska, launched a programme of 
sickie-social support with UN agencies.

Oleksandra Matviichuk, a  mortal rights 
counsel, is the director of Kyiv’s Centre for Civil Liberties, which
participated the 2022 Nobel Peace Prize. She and her  platoon have spent the  once eight times  establishing some,000 Russian war crimes in
Ukraine, from murder and torture to rape. She describes Russian treatment of
Ukrainians as showing ‘ genocidal intent ’.

Despite their contribution to the war effort,
Ukrainian women remain a minority in national decision-making positions. Around
21% of elected members of the national parliament are women, up from 12% in
2014. This is significantly lower than other countries such as France at just
over 37%, Germany at 35%, Spain at 47% and Sweden at 46%. . Finland has a  coalition government of five women-led
parties led by  Prime Minister Sanna
Marin.

 The
Ukrainian government has the same proportion of women in its cabinet (five out
of 24) as in the Chamber of Deputies.Not much by European standards, although
among them are Yulia Swyrydenko, First Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of
Economy, and Iryna Vereshchuk, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for the
Reintegration of Temporarily Occupied Territories.

 Klympush-Tsintsadze says more women are
needed: “At the highest level, there are certainly more men making decisions,
which means that women’s voice is  not
decisive.

How women create peace

Unless this happens, women’s input will be
missing in any accommodations to end the conflict. When women don’t  share, as in Bosnia- Herzegovina, Kosovo and
Colombia, the  continuity of peace deals
decreases by 15 times, according to a 2015 report by the Institute for
Peace.   Ukrainians are  formerly looking to a future free of
Russian  hindrance. Political leaders are
calling for  transnational support to
finance the reconstruction of the country – a cost estimated at between$ 350
billion and$ 750 billion and rising.

Despite their contribution to the war effort,
Ukrainian women remain a minority in national decision-making positions. About
21% of the elected members of the national parliament are women, up from 12% in
2014. This is much lower than other countries like France with just over 37%,
Germany with 35%, Spain with 47% and Sweden with 46% . Finland has a  coalition government of five women-led
parties led by  Prime Minister Sanna
Marin.

 The
Ukrainian government has the same proportion of women in its cabinet (five out
of 24) as in the Chamber of Deputies.Not much by European standards, although
among them are Yulia Swyrydenko, First Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of
Economy, and Iryna Vereshchuk, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for the
Reintegration of Temporarily Occupied Territories.

 Klympush-Tsintsadze
says more women are needed: “At the highest level, there are certainly more men
making decisions, which means that women’s voice is  not decisive.

As part of a recentanti-corruption drive, there
have been  further than a dozen
government adoptions, including Kyrylo Tymoshenko, deputy Head of the Office of
the President, and Oleksiy Symonenko, deputy Prosecutor General. Five
indigenous governors have also been sacked. Anover-reliance on the  manly- led security forces when the fighting
is over increases the  threat of a
regression to old- style patriarchal advancement or  farther conflict.

Matviichuk admits that Ukraine’s ‘  nethermost-up culture has done well fighting
authoritarian administrations but it isn’t so good at  erecting sustainable popular institutions ’.
A politically weak Ukraine, with high 
situations of corruption, will be prey to  unborn attacks and the West may  vacillate to continue to support its
independence.   The UN Office on
medicines and Crime  set up clear
correlations between  womanish leadership
and low  situations of corruption. This
is because a society with high 
situations of gender equity signals a country of strong
institutions,  similar as a free press
and healthy bar. Matviichuk argues that a lesser  womanish 
part in government would indicate that ‘ democratization and justice
were running  coincidently with  moment’s fighting ’.

Ukraine’s women ‘must come home’

But 
adding   womanish participation
faces another challenge as 90 per cent of those who have fled the fighting are
women and children. ‘ Ukrainians are hard- working, well- acclimated people and
will find their places in other societies, but we need them to come home, ’
said Klympush- Tsintsadze.

Iryna Yarmolenko, a  youthful 
mama  from Irpin, a Kyiv satellite  city heavily damaged in the first weeks of
the war, is now grounded in Paris and part of an active diaspora coordinating
reconditioning  systems. They’re helping
design a redevelopment model that it’s hoped can be copied across Ukraine.   But if Zelenskyy’s New Year’s call for
Ukrainian women like Iryna to return is to be heeded, they must be given
positions of responsibility in policy- 
timber. Ukraine must strengthen its republic for EU accession now. As
Matviichuk and others argue ‘ Without women’s  sweats, the problems will just be  laid over, and nothing will change. ’

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